Tanindon (Beef and Egg Rice Bowl) 他人丼 • Just One Cookbook

Quick and delicious, this Beef and Egg Rice Bowl called Tanindon is comfort food at its best. With thinly sliced beef and eggs cooked in a savory-sweet sauce and served over steamed rice, you’ll devour every bite! It’s a speedy meal that you can make in 20 minutes!

A Japanese donburi bowl containing Tanindon, which is simmered beef and egg over steamed rice.

If someone asks what are my go-to quick meals, I’d probably say donburi. Donburi refers to a Japanese rice bowl dish that’s topped with savory meat, seafood, tofu, or vegetables. The most popular donburi—or “don” for short—are Gyudon and Oyakodon. Today I’m here to introduce another favorite called Beef and Egg Rice Bowl, or Tanindon (他人丼).

What is Tanindon?

Tanindon (他人丼) is a classic donburi dish made with beef or pork with sliced onion and egg cooked in a savory-and-slightly sweet sauce and served atop of steamed rice. It is like a cousin to both gyudon and oyakodon. Let’s see the difference:

  • Gyudonbeef and onion slices are simmered in dashi broth and served over steamed rice.
  • Oyakodonchicken and onion slices are simmered in dashi broth, topped with drizzle of eggs, and served over steamed rice.
  • Tanindonbeef or pork and onion slices are simmered in dashi broth, topped with beaten eggs, and served over steamed rice.

Tanin (他人) literally means “outsider, stranger, or unrelated person” in Japanese language, so tanin-don is a playful reference to oyakodon (oyako means “parent and child”). Contrary to oyakodon, which uses chicken and egg, tanindon is made with egg and an unrelated meat, which is beef (or pork).

Tanindon vs. Kaikadon

On the topic of names, this donburi dish can also be called differently depending on the regions in Japan on account of the historical background. People in western Japan, such as the Osaka area, call the rice bowl Tanindon and they prefer beef over pork as the choice of meat. 

However, in eastern Japan such as Tokyo area, it goes by the name of Kaikadon (開化丼) and either beef or pork is used. Kaika means civilization in Japanese. The name has to do with the start of Japan’s modernization and the consumption of beef in the Meiji era, but let’s save the details before it gets too confusing. Most importantly, you know what to order from the menu when you’re in Japan. 

A Japanese donburi bowl containing Tanindon, which is simmered beef and egg over steamed rice.

How to Make Tanindon

Ingredients You’ll Need

  • Onion
  • Thinly-sliced beef – I highly recommend ribeye or chuck. You can’t buy thinly sliced meat at a Japanese/Asian grocery store? Slice your own!
  • Eggs
  • Green onions
  • Dashi (Japanese soup stock) – New to dashi? Read this post first. You can make this soup stock with dashi powder, dashi packet, or from scratch.
  • Seasonings – soy sauce, sake, mirin, and sugar
  • Steamed rice
  • Pickled red ginger

Overview: Cooking Steps

  1. Cut the onion, beef, and green onion.
  2. Put the onion slices, beef, dashi, and seasonings in a pan.
  3. Cook the ingredients until they are cooked through.
  4. Drizzle beaten eggs and put the green onion on top.
  5. Serve over steamed rice in individual bowls and enjoy!
A Japanese donburi bowl containing Tanindon, which is simmered beef and egg over steamed rice.

5 Tips to Make Beef and Egg Bowl

  • Flash freeze the beef (for 10 minutes) until the surface of the meat hardens for easy slicing.
  • Slice the onion thinly so that it will cook faster.
  • Spread the onion slices in the pan and put the meat on top.
  • Use a tight-fitting lid so the simmering broth will not evaporate and you’ll have a sauce to spoon over steamed rice.
  • Slowly drizzle a small amount of the beaten eggs over the simmering beef. Place your cooking chopsticks at the edge of the bowl that contains the beaten eggs. This will help drizzle the eggs. Do not mix the eggs with beef.
A Japanese donburi bowl containing Tanindon, which is simmered beef and egg over steamed rice.

Quick Side Dishes to Serve with Tanindon

Tanindon is a fulfilling dish on its own so you don’t really have to pair it with anything. However, if you would like to serve the rice bowl with one or two side dishes, here are my recommendations:

Tableware from Musubi Kiln

I’ve partnered with a great ceramic online shop from Japan called Musubi Kiln. You will get 10% off with a coupon code JUSTONECOOKBOOK for your purchase. In this post, I’ve used:

A Japanese donburi bowl containing Tanindon, which is simmered beef and egg over steamed rice.

Wish to learn more about Japanese cooking? Sign up for our free newsletter to receive cooking tips & recipe updates! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterestYouTube, and Instagram.

A Japanese donburi bowl containing Tanindon, which is simmered beef and egg over steamed rice.

Beef and Egg Bowl (Tanindon)

Quick and delicious, this Beef and Egg Rice Bowl called Tanindon is comfort food at its best. With thinly sliced beef and eggs cooked in a savory-sweet sauce and served over steamed rice, you’ll devour every bite! It’s a speedy meal that you can make in 20 minutes!

Ingredients 

 

Japanese Ingredient Substitution: If you want substitutes for Japanese condiments and ingredients, click here.

Instructions 

To Prepare the Ingredients

To Cook the Tanindon

  • In a large frying pan (do not turn on the heat yet), add the dashi, soy sauce, sake, mirin, and sugar. Mix to combine.

  • Next, add the onion slices and spread them throughout the pan, separating the onion layers.

  • Then, add the meat on top of the onions. Separate the thin slices of beef so the meat covers the onions.

  • Cover the pan with a lid and start cooking over medium heat.

  • When the meat is cooked, skim off the scum and fat from the broth with a fine-mesh skimmer. Turn down the heat to simmer and continue cooking, covered, for 3-4 minutes.
  • Slowly drizzle a thin stream of the beaten eggs over the simmering beef, placing your cooking chopsticks at the edge of the bowl with the eggs to control the flow. Do not mix the egg with the beef. Sprinkle the green onions on top and cook covered on medium-low heat until the egg is done to your liking (but don’t overcook it). Usually, rice bowls with eggs in Japan are served while the egg is almost set but still runny. Remove from the heat.

To Serve

  • Serve the steamed rice in donburi rice bowls and put the beef and egg mixture on top. If you’d like, drizzle the remaining sauce on top. Top with pickled red ginger and shichimi togarashi (optional). Enjoy!

Nutrition

Calories: 532 kcal · Carbohydrates: 43 g · Protein: 34 g · Fat: 21 g · Saturated Fat: 9 g · Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g · Monounsaturated Fat: 10 g · Trans Fat: 1 g · Cholesterol: 255 mg · Sodium: 1144 mg · Potassium: 537 mg · Fiber: 1 g · Sugar: 11 g · Vitamin A: 348 IU · Vitamin C: 7 mg · Calcium: 59 mg · Iron: 5 mg

Author: Namiko Chen

Course: Main Course

Cuisine: Japanese

Keyword: beef, donburi, egg

©JustOneCookbook.com Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any website or social media is strictly prohibited. Please view my photo use policy here.