How the Most Decadent Pasta Dish at Montrose Restaurant Nobie’s Is Made

How the Most Decadent Pasta Dish at Montrose Restaurant Nobie’s Is Made

Table of Contents

At Nobie’s, the resourceful Montrose cafe helmed by chef Martin Stayer, there is no dish on the menu much more decadent than the Freak In The Sheets. A luscious plate that brings together fragile sheets of squid ink pasta, buttery uni, tender Gulf crab, and smoky trout roe, it is quickly become one particular of the restaurant’s most preferred offerings.

“We provide out most evenings,” Stayer claims. “We do not have a whole lot of place for refrigerated storage, so we do not bring in a lot of luxury products on any offered working day. If our fridge goes down, we do not want to eliminate a great deal. I also make all the pasta by hand, and I can only do so much, primarily today with working two dining establishments and anything else heading on.”

The dish bought its origins as a distinctive type of pasta altogether — a riff on spaghetti alla chitarra that was created with squid ink, layered with butter and king crab, and topped with an airy clam foam. Soon after hanging about on the menu for a though, Stayer bought exhausted of the dish, but sooner or later determined to reimagine it thanks to consumer desire. “Everyone was begging me to deliver this crab pasta back, and I made the decision to do it just a very little little bit in another way this time.”

Thinking how a person of Montrose’s most well-known dishes is manufactured? Get a peek down below at the approach stage-by-stage, courtesy of Eater photographer Caroline Fontenot.

Very first, Stayer helps make the pitch-black pasta. Created only with two various varieties of flour — semolina, and 00 wheat — eggs, and squid ink, the dough is rolled into skinny sheets and slice into a “handkerchief” shape.

Then, the chef prepares a sauce for the pasta, starting off with a compound butter that’s created with togarashi. That butter is combined with pureed sea urchin roe, or uni, which is been passed as a result of a sieve for a tremendous-sleek texture. In the meantime, Stayer brines clean crab — that phase assures that the crab stays wonderful and tender — and poaches the meat in butter.

Following, the pasta is prepared in boiling water, then put in a sizzling pan with some of that uni-togarashi compound butter sauce and a little pasta h2o to emulsify the silky sauce.

Now, it is time to plate the dish. Stayer and his crew just take more care to assure that the sheets of handkerchief pasta are folded just so — to guarantee that there are little morsels of crab meat and trout roe in just about every chunk.

Then, Stayer tops the plate with a gentle, aerated potato puree which is infused with clam juice for even far more briny kick. Additional crab is layered on prime, along with a huge spoonful of plump, frivolously smoked trout roe.

Last but not least, the dish is garnished with a sprinkle of bee pollen and lemon zest, which provides each floral notes and a dose of punchy brightness.