Hiyashi Chuka (Cold Ramen) 冷やし中華 • Just One Cookbook

Cool down and relax with this popular Japanese Cold Ramen called Hiyashi Chuka. The chilled noodles are mixed with homemade dressing and topped with egg, imitation crab, ham, cucumber, and tomato. It’s a bright, flavorful, and fun way to experience the magic of ramen on a hot summer day. This recipe is vegan adaptable.

A white plate containing cold ramen (Hiyashi Chuka) with julienned cucumber, ham, egg, and more!

As the temperature and humidity soar in Japan in the late summer, I just want to eat chilled noodle dishes like cold soba or cold udon. But when it gets extra hot, all I can think about is the flavorful, rainbow color of toppings on a bowl of cold ramen called Hiyashi Chuka (冷やし中華).

Today, I’m sharing a hiyashi chuka recipe with my favorite homemade soy sauce-based noodle dressing.

What is Hiyashi Chuka?

Hiyashi Chuka (冷やし中華) literally means “chilled Chinese-style”, but in fact it refers to a popular Japanese summer dish of which chilled ramen noodles paired with toppings such as strips of thin omelette, cucumber, ham, and imitation (or real) crab. To tie everything together, it’s served with a soy sauce-based dressing that is sweet, savory, nutty, and acidic.

Refreshing and chewy, crisp and crunchy, sweet and savory—there’s plenty of flavors and textures in this chilled noodle dish that it’s hard not to fall in love with it!

I also love that it is highly versatile so you can be creative and switch up the toppings as you like.

A white plate containing cold ramen (Hiyashi Chuka) with julienned cucumber, ham, egg, and more!

Hiyashi Chuka Topping Ideas

The classic hiyashi chuka consists of ramen noodles, egg, ham, imitation crab, cucumber, and tomatoes. However, there’s always room for customization. Here, I suggest a few variations:

  • Avocado
  • Blanched bean sprout
  • Boiled egg
  • Canned tuna
  • Chashu
  • Cooked shrimp
  • Fried firm tofu
  • Shredded chicken (rotisserie, boiled)
  • Mizuna
  • Lettuce
  • Shredded nori
  • Sautéed mushrooms

Where to Get Hiyashi Chuka Noodles

Japanese and Asian grocery stores carry Hiyashi Chuka (Cold Ramen) noodles in the refrigerated section. You can figure out the package easily as it usually has an image of the classic hiyashi chuka, shown below.

Hiyashi Chuka Noodles

Typically, there are one to two kinds of hiyashi chuka: soy sauce dressing and sesame dressing. I am not a big fan of using the packaged sauce (check the ingredient list before you decide) so I have both dressing recipes on Just One Cookbook. The homemade sauces are healthier and easy to make at home!

Since the noodles are fresh, you probably can’t find them online. In that case, you can try these dried ramen noodles.

Make Vegetarian/Vegan-Friendly Hiyashi Chuka

If you are vegetarian, simply omit ham and imitation crab (and egg, if vegan) and add your favorite veggies or tofu instead.

You can make the dressing by swapping the chicken stock with vegetable broth, kombu dashi, or water.

A white plate containing cold ramen (Hiyashi Chuka) with julienned cucumber, ham, egg, and more!

Hiyashi Chuka Cooking Tips

  • Start preparing the dressing and omelette, which require cooking and then cooling down.
  • Cut the topping ingredients into thin strips or bite-sized—”noodle-thin” strip for most toppings so that you can enjoy them with the noodles in one bite.
  • Rinse the noodles under cold running water. It’s important to rinse off the starch for a better texture.
  • Keep the toppings, noodles, and dressing chilled for the ultimate cold noodle experience!
  • Gradually add the dressing; you don’t have to use it all.

On hot days, a cold noodle dish like hiyashi chuka is a nutritious meal to cool your body down, while filling up your tummy. Now pick up fresh hiyashi chuka noodles from an Asian or Japanese grocery store, prepare your favorite toppings, and create this cool Japanese dish!

More Cold Noodle Recipes to Enjoy

A white plate containing cold ramen (Hiyashi Chuka) with julienned cucumber, ham, egg, and more!

Wish to learn more about Japanese cooking? Sign up for our free newsletter to receive cooking tips & recipe updates! And stay in touch with me on FacebookPinterestYouTube, and Instagram.

A white plate containing cold ramen (Hiyashi Chuka) with julienned cucumber, ham, egg, and more!

Hiyashi Chuka (Cold Ramen)

Cool down and relax with this popular Japanese Cold Ramen called Hiyashi Chuka. The chilled noodles are mixed with homemade dressing and topped with egg, imitation crab, ham, cucumber, and tomato. It’s a bright, flavorful, and fun way to experience the magic of ramen on a hot summer day. This recipe is vegan adaptable.

Prep Time: 20 mins

Cook Time: 10 mins

Total Time: 30 mins

Ingredients 

 

Japanese Ingredient Substitution: If you want substitutes for Japanese condiments and ingredients, click here.

Instructions 

To Cook the Noodles

  • Bring a big pot of water to a boil. Loosen and separate the fresh noodles with your hands and add them to the boiling water. Cook the noodles according to the package directions. Tip: I usually cook the noodles for less time for a firm, al dente consistency.

  • Transfer the cooked noodles to a colander and rinse them thoroughly with your hands under cold running water. This stops the cooking, cools the noodles, and removes the excess starch. Drain completely, shaking the colander to remove the excess water.

Nutrition

Calories: 360 kcal · Carbohydrates: 47 g · Protein: 17 g · Fat: 11 g · Saturated Fat: 3 g · Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g · Monounsaturated Fat: 4 g · Trans Fat: 0.01 g · Cholesterol: 140 mg · Sodium: 1395 mg · Potassium: 311 mg · Fiber: 3 g · Sugar: 12 g · Vitamin A: 706 IU · Vitamin C: 9 mg · Calcium: 38 mg · Iron: 2 mg

Author: Namiko Chen

Course: Main Course

Cuisine: Japanese

Keyword: cold noodle, ramen

©JustOneCookbook.com Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any website or social media is strictly prohibited. Please view my photo use policy here.

Editor’s Note: The post was originally published on July 7, 2013. The images and blog post have been updated and the recipe is slightly revised on July 17, 2022.